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Blueprint for Total Health Turnaround
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Can mRNA COVID Vaccines Cause Heart Inflammation?



A Study Finds Dramatic Increase in Inflammatory Markers and ACS Risk

In recent months, concerns have been raised about the potential link between mRNA COVID vaccines and heart inflammation. A new study conducted by a group of researchers provides insight into the matter, and the findings are alarming. The study indicates that mRNA COVID vaccines can cause a significant increase in inflammation markers of the heart, as well as increase the risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS).


The PULS Cardiac Test

Using the PULS Cardiac Test (GD Biosciences, Inc, Irvine, CA), the researchers measured multiple protein biomarkers, including IL-16, sFas, and HGF, which are associated with inflammation and T cell infiltration of cardiac muscle.



The test generates a score predicting the 5-year risk of a new ACS. The study was conducted on 566 patients aged 28 to 97, M:F ratio 1:1, seen in a preventive cardiology practice. The patients were tested 2 to 10 weeks following the second COVID vaccine shot and compared to their previous test results taken 3 to 5 months before the shot.


The Results

The results showed that there was a dramatic increase in the inflammatory markers of the heart after the second shot, with IL-16 increasing from 35+/-20 above the norm to 82+/-75 above the norm, sFas increasing from 22+/-15 above the norm to 46+/-24 above the norm, and HGF increasing from 42+/-12 above the norm to 86+/-31 above the norm. These changes resulted in an increase in the PULS score from 11% 5-year ACS risk to 25% 5-year ACS risk. At the time of this report, these changes persist for at least 2.5 months post-second dose of the vaccine.


Conclusion

The study suggests that the mRNA COVID vaccines can significantly increase inflammation on the endothelium and T cell infiltration of cardiac muscle. The increase in inflammatory markers can account for the observations of increased thrombosis, cardiomyopathy, and other vascular events following vaccination.


Takeaway

In conclusion, this study provides evidence of the potential link between mRNA COVID vaccines and heart inflammation. The findings suggest that mRNA vaccines can cause a significant increase in inflammation markers of the heart and increase the risk of ACS. The study raises concerns about the safety of mRNA vaccines and highlights the need for further research into the matter.


Note:

It's important to note that this is just one study, and more research is needed to confirm these findings. The benefits of getting vaccinated against COVID-19 still outweigh the risks, especially for those at higher risk of severe illness or death from the virus. If you have concerns or questions about the COVID-19 vaccine, talk to your healthcare provider.

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